Goodbye to Oprah and Patrick

Today was a super busy Sunday! I met the therio crew for the last time at 8am this morning. We had lots to do! First we checked on all of our lovely ladies, including one of my favorite patients, Oprah:

ImageIt’s a fitting name… She is super sweet and adorable, and I will truly miss her little face each morning :)

After TPR-ing our girls, we headed to ICU to see our mare with the retained placenta and her foal. The foal’s name is Patrick and he is the silliest little turkey, we always have a good time chasing him around. Yesterday while we were flushing his mama out he decided that it was super fun to gallop (as well as he can at three days old) around the Medicine ward and slide to a stop on the wet floor. He was like a little kid in socks sliding up and down the hallways!

We pulled the mare out this morning to flush her uterus again, trying to get it to release the placenta. It has been four days since she gave birth to Patrick, and at this point we were not very optimistic that it was going to come out nicely. The therio resident told us that more than likely it was going to become necrotic, or basically start rotting and fall out in pieces. I know this is icky, sorry :(

Anyway, after flushing 8 liters of de-ionized water with Betadine solution and a little salt through her uterus, we gave up for the day. The fluid wasn’t getting any clearer, and we didn’t seem to be making any progress. We put the mare and her kiddo back in the ICU stall and let them recuperate. About twenty minutes later we looked up (in the middle of another emergency) and what do we see laying in the stall? Placenta!!!

We pulled it out and lay it on the floor to make sure the whole thing was intact. We were even able to fill it up with water to make sure no little pieces were still stuck inside her uterus. It was such a good moment, this mare’s prognosis is way better now that she’s passed that nasty thing.

After all the placenta excitement, we had a pseudo-reproductive emergency come in. The story we were told was that a pregnant mare, relatively close to term (although the owner was not 100% sure when she was due) was coming in because she was reluctant to move and she had some loud gurgling coming from her belly. Kind of a strange story, but we were like “Okay, let’s just see what this is all about.” Once the mare arrived it was obvious that something serious was going on. She had large plaques of ventral edema, was running a mild fever and had a heart rate of 80 beat per minute (normal is 24-42). The therio team determined that there was nothing reproductively wrong with her, so we bowed out of the case. Internal medicine stepped in to take over, and word through the grapevine is that she has severe pleuropneumonia. This could be bad news for both her and the fetus, so we’ll just have to see how it plays out. The most frustrating issue with the case while we were involved was that the owner was not only extremely ignorant (which is forgivable in most circumstances), but she was also very defensive about what was going on with her mare. She didn’t seem to understand that we had to ask her questions in order for us to better determine what was wrong with the horse.

Please understand that if you take your horse (or any pet) to the veterinarian, we are not asking questions to judge you, your lifestyle, your choices or your ability to care for your animal. We are asking questions in the best interest of the patient to try to determine what could possibly be wrong with them.

After we finally finished up for the day, I drove straight over to the grocery store with my weekly meal plan to pick up the groceries I will need for the week. Here are the results of my shopping trip:

ImageSo much tasty in one photo! I was super psyched to try some of my planned meals today. I had the fig sandwich for lunch and black bean tacos for dinner. They were both delicious and I will try to take pics and post recipes once I find a way to make them prettier ;)

That’s all for today!

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